Dec 202015
 

AFP_Getty-535942882-760x525

Are you looking for a Christmas gift for a runner (or for yourself!)

Our Services

We offer a range of  training services. These include

  • Training Analysis, Assessment & Advice
  • Personal Training Programmes for your specific individual needs
  • Ongoing Training Support
  • Bespoke Services for unique training requirements

If you you would like further details of our training, advice and support packages we offer please email us at info@ultrafitnesstraining.com

We always offer a friendly and personal service to all our clients – please do not hesitate to get in touch and we will be happy to help with further information at any time.

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Dec 202015
 

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

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Dec 202015
 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

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Nov 232015
 

runner-557130_640Our Services

We offer a range of  training services. These include

  • Training Analysis, Assessment & Advice
  • Personal Training Programmes for your specific individual needs
  • Ongoing Training Support
  • Bespoke Services for unique training requirements

If you you would like further details of our training, advice and support packages we offer please email us at info@ultrafitnesstraining.com

We always offer a friendly and personal service to all our clients – please do not hesitate to get in touch and we will be happy to help with further information at any time.

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Nov 032015
 

The 3Rs of Training

by Shaun Brassfield-Thorpe

Remember the 3-Rs of training :runners-635906_640

Relaxation     Rest     Recovery

A few aphorisms from Shaun :

“A time for recovery between exercise sessions is not just desirable, it is inevitable.”

“You either plan your life (training and work etc) to allow for sufficient recovery, or, eventually, you are forced to stop in order to recover.”

“In the long term you cannot choose not to allow time for recovery – but you can choose when to allow time to recover”

Lunges

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Nov 022015
 

runners-373099_640Achieving Your Goals – The A.I.M. Approach

by Shaun Brassfield-Thorpe

 

Effective goal setting means defining specific aims and targets that are

1) (with time and effort) actually Attainable

2) Clearly Identified

3) In some way Measurable

Think of this as AIM –

Attainable – Identified – Measurable

– and ask yourself if your goal meets these criteria?

For example, being able to run for 50 miles, or to run a half-marathon in 2hrs 30 mins are examples of effective, clearly defined goals.

I) They are attainable if you practice long enough and hard enough.

II) They are clearly identified not simply a vague desire to improve.

III) They can be measured allowing you to know if you are improving, if you are getting closer to achieving your goal, and/or when you have achieved/surpassed Image7the goal.

Examples of poorly defined – and thus less effective – goals would be things like “getting fitter” (How will you determine if you are fitter?) or “running faster” (At what speed and under what conditions? For how long? Over what distance?) – etc. These are poorly defined and thus ineffective goals – they do not allow for an easy way to measure progress or define success in achieving the goal.

Defining goals is the most important first step.

Having defined your goals, training can then be planned by determining what you need to do in training in order to achieve your goals.

Having clear goals then also helps keep you motivated and focused during training.

Effective goal setting usually means the goal should contain a measurable element.

Running a specific distance is something that can be measured.

Deadlift - photo 2Lifting a specific weight is something that can be measured.

Achieving a specific speed or time is something that can be measured.

If a goal itself is measurable this means that progress towards a goal can also be measured.

If you wish to be able to run 26 miles and at present you can manage to run 10 miles, then if in training you develop the ability to run 15 miles you are improving and moving closer to achieving your goal.

Having a poorly defined goal does not allow easily measurable and quantifiable progress; if your goal was to “run further” would being able to run 15 miles mean you have already achieved your goal, or that you still have a long way to go? How far is far?Is you current performance a small improvement or a huge improvement?

Clearly defining your goals allows suitable training to be chosen and it allows you to measure your progress (and thus tell if the training is working).

 

William Olympic Torch 2012

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Nov 012015
 

runner-557130_640Getting The Most From Personal Bests

by Shaun Brassfield-Thorpe

There is an old rhyme which goes

Good – Better – Best

Never let it rest

Until your Good is Better

And your Better is Best.

 

This is really a good motto for anyone seriously intending to improve their performance in either training or an event.

But how do you know what is Good, what is Better and what is Best in relation to your own performance?

  1. First you have to record your performance on a regular basis.
  2. Then you have to actually understand what your specific performance means.
  3. And then you can set about meaningfully improving on your current personal best.

Let’s look at this a little more closely.

First, if you are not already doing so, you should get into the habit of recording your training in a training diary and recording your performance in events and competitions (for example in the form of a race report or an equivalent for your sport).

Secondly you should make an easy to read list of your current and all-time PBs. This may sound very simple, but there can be more to the question “Is this a Personal Best?” than you might think. Our article on Understanding Personal Bests may help.

Thirdly you should use your knowledge of your PBs to improve your training – and your event performance.

Using your Personal Bests to build on your successes in training and events

Personal Bests (PBs) should not simply be a static record of your achievements. They should be used to give you a clear target to beat in your training or competition.

First you must establish a Personal Best (PB) for a session/exercise/distance etc. Only count as a PB a time/distance/etc that you have established without suffering any major undue adverse reaction (e.g. if in the process of setting a PB you caused yourself an injury you would not count this!).

Don’t restrict recoding PBs to just one area of training – for example trying to get a better time for 5km on the flat. Instead, record your PBs for virtually all types of training you do (running, weights, cross-training etc) and break this down into PBs for all meaningful variations e.g. speed work; distance; uphill sessions; downhill sessions; running with or without XL; each individual weights exercise – including recording variables such as max weight, reps and sets; duration and speed on an exercise bike – and so on. This might sound quite a lot of paperwork and number-crunching to do but

A) It is not difficult to do

B) It only takes a couple of minutes at a time

and most importantly

C) It can lead to a great deal of improvement

Having established your PBs, try to improve upon your current PB next time you perform the same session. Don’t just have a vague idea of “doing a bit better”, set a concrete goal to achieve such as 1 second faster, 1 kg heavier or 1 minute longer duration.

Know what your current PB is – and thus what you are trying to beat – before every session. This will keep you clearly focused on producing a better performance every time you train.

Keep doing this regularly and your performance will always be improving.

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Nov 122013
 

As part of a Russian campaign to make citizens healthier, riders who buy a ticket at Vystavochnaya station in western Moscow have the option of paying in squats.

At the Vystavochaya metro station in western Moscow, a woman squats in front of a vending machine that sells subway tickets for squats instead of money. (Credit: Yuri Kadobnov/AFP )

Full story on :

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57611796-1/to-ride-the-moscow-subway-for-free-do-30-squats/

 

So here’s an idea to improve the nation’s health – scrap congestion charges and instead introduce a policy of no-entry without exercise ;)

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Nov 092013
 

Discovery of new ligament in human knee may revolutionize how injuries are treated, surgeries conducted

“The implications are obvious for the athletic population,”

More on this link : http://life.nationalpost.com/2013/11/06/discovery-of-new-part-of-human-knee-the-anterolateral-ligament-may-revolutionize-how-injuries-are-treated-surgeries-conducted-belgium-researchers/

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Oct 212013
 

Eight Reasons Wheat May Not Be Good for Anyone

 

Wheat’s not good for anyone, whether you have gluten sensitivity, celiac disease, or neither. Although wheat does offer some health benefits, the same benefits can easily be found in other foods without the unpleasant side effects that many, if not most, people experience. Here are eight reasons wheat isn’t good for you:

Humans don’t fully digest wheat

The human stomach doesn’t fully digest wheat. Cows, sheep, and other ruminant animals do just fine with wheat because they have more than one stomach to fully break down wheat and complete the digestion process. Humans have only one stomach. When the wheat leaves our tummies, it’s not fully digested. Those undigested portions begin to ferment, causing uncomfortable gas and bloating.

Wheat is a pro-inflammatory agent

Pro-inflammatory foods rapidly convert to sugar, causing a rise in the body’s insulin levels, causing a burst of inflammation at the cellular level. The inflammation occurs in all people, not just those with wheat or gluten sensitivities. Inflammation, once thought to be limited to -itis conditions like arthritis, may actually be at the root of a number of serious conditions, including heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and some types of cancer.

Wheat can cause leaky gut syndrome

In general, leaky gut syndrome is a condition whereby stuff is leaking from your gut into your bloodstream — stuff like toxins and large molecules like gluten. Eating wheat makes bodies produce extra amounts of a protein called zonulin, which helps regulate the passage of nutrients into the bloodstream. High zonulin levels enable things to get into the bloodstream.

Refined wheat has little nutritional value

Most of the wheat people eat is refined, which means manufacturers take perfectly good wheat — which has some nutritional value, especially in the bran and germ — and they take the good stuff away. Sadly, most of our wheat-based products use refined, making them high–glycemic index foods.

Wheat may cause wrinkles

According to some experts, the inflammatory effect of wheat — especially refined wheat — can cause skin wrinkles. The most famous of these experts is Dr. Nicholas Perricone, a dermatologist and adjunct professor of medicine at Michigan State University. Although Dr. Perricone doesn’t pinpoint gluten as a culprit per se, he does say that avoiding foods like wheat may help reverse the aging process.

Wheat is one of the top-eight allergens

Millions of people are allergic to wheat — so many, in fact, that it has made it onto the top-eight allergen list. Allergic reactions to wheat can include gastrointestinal distress (stomach upset), eczema, hay fever, hives, asthma, and even anaphylaxis (a severe, whole-body allergic reaction), which is life-threatening.

Wheat can mess up blood sugar levels

Some foods cause blood sugar levels to spike, which causes your body to produce insulin. That, in turn, causes your blood sugar to fall dramatically. Your blood sugar levels go up and down like a roller coaster.

Our bodies are designed to work with stable blood sugar levels. When they’re erratic, it causes a domino effect of not-so-healthy things to occur, such as hypoglycemia — low blood sugar. Most people don’t have “true” hypoglycemia, but may feel hypoglycemic when their blood sugar drops too much. The problem with the idea of “fixing” this feeling with sugary foods is that it just continues this roller coaster of blood sugar levels. One of the most serious conditions that can result from blood sugar whiplash is insulin resistance and diabetes.

Wheat can make you fat

Eating wheat creates “sneaky fat” — the kind that sneaks up on you when you think you’re doing everything right. It could just be the wheat — especially refined wheat. Refined wheat is a high–glycemic index food that causes your blood sugar to spike. That makes your body produce insulin, which, by the way, is often referred to as the “fat-storing hormone.”

 

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